Published Articles

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My article, ‘You’re Not in Ireland Now’: Landscape and Loss in Irish Women’s Poetry’, is published in Affective Landscapes in Literature, Art and Everyday Life, ed. by Christine Berberich, Neil Campbell and Robert Hudson, Ashgate, 2015. The article discusses poetry by Eavan Boland, Maura Dooley and Catherine Byron. I was thrilled to have the article cited by Ellen McWilliams (Exeter University).

Bob Robinson’s Art of the Absurd
I was asked to write this short article (click on link above) on the works of Bob Robinson for his two-part Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture in the Surface Gallery in October-December 2014. It was a daunting task as Bob was a friend, but as I’m also a keen fan, I’m glad I rose to the challenge, and let him and others know how much I appreciated his work. I really enjoyed re-viewing his paintings and sculptures, and thinking and writing about them. Bob  passed away in September 2015. Rest in Peace, friend.
Part 2 of the exhibition ran 28 Nov – 20 December.

I was commissioned to write a short article (pp. 4 – 6) about playwright Martin McDonagh and his work for the programme for the production of The Beauty Queen of Leenane which ran 18 Oct – 9 Nov at Curve Theatre, Leicester, and another brief article on the West of Ireland setting of the play: ‘Leenane, A Lovely Part of the World‘ (pp. 7-11).
I loved working on this play again, because I once spent months in rehearsal for the part of Maureen in an amateur production;  it never happened, unfortunately. I live in hope.

‘The Kerry Babies Case: A Crime against women’, in Crime, ed. by Ross Bradshaw, Five Leaves, 2013, pp. 107-114 (isbn 9781907869792).
I’m still glowing from having this article praised by John Lucas of Shoestring Press. John taught me when I was a mature student (1988-91) and just starting out in academia, and has been a mentor and inspiration ever since, so his commendation means a lot to me.
Crime
Crime  is one of the Christmas selection by London Review of Books. I’m absurdly pleased that the picture on p. 27 of the 21 November issue shows my name on the bookcover in legible font (not legible in this picture, but it is in the publication). Crime in LRB
‘“My Ways Are My Own”: Female, Family and Farm in Sam Hanna Bell’s December Bride’, in Celtic Connections: Irish-Scottish Relations and the Politics of Culture, ed. by Willy Maley and Alison O’Malley-Younger, Dublin: Peter Lang, 2012.Celtic Connections book‘Marge Piercy’s Non-Utopia in Woman on the Edge of Time, in Utopia, ed. by Ross Bradshaw, Nottingham: Five Leaves, 2012‘”The Way to the Past”: Eavan Boland’s Remapping of Irish History’ in Maps, ed. by Ross Bradshaw, Five Leaves, 2011.‘Pictures and Places: Enclaves of illusion in the life-writings of Elizabeth Bowen and Annabel Goff’ in Life Writing, ed. by Richard Bradford, Palgrave, 2010‘Last of their Line: The Disappearing Anglo-Irish in Twentieth-century Fictions and Autobiographies’, in Irish Protestant Identities, edited by Mervyn Busteed, Frank Neal and Jonathan Tonge, Manchester University Press, 2008.‘”One of themselves”: Class divisions in Eilís Dillon’s The Bitter Glass and Blood Relations’, in No Country For Old Men: Fresh Perspectives on Irish Literature, edited by Paddy Lyons and Alison O’Malley Younger, Dublin: Peter Lang, 2008.‘”Scandalous Women”: Unmarried Mothers in Short Stories by Mary Lavin, Edna O’Brien and Éilís Ní Dhuibhne’, in Single Motherhood  in Twentieth-Century Ireland: Cultural, Historical and Social Essays, edited by Maria Cinta Ramblado-Minero and Maria Auxiliadora Pérez-Vides, Edwin Mellen, 2006.‘Let Her Think Opinions are Accursed’, Ms.chief, 13 (1996); reprinted in Broadcast, (Blackwell’s Academic Bookshop’s In-house journal) Spring 1997.

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ONLINE

* NISG + Nottm City of Literature
This is my blog post on Nottingham Irish Studies Group, outlining some of our literary activities, as part of Nottingham’s successful bid to become a UNESCO City of Literature. The bid really deserved to succeed; many of my friends in this city have been made through literary events and enterprise, and there’s always interesting stuff going on.

* I am pleased to have my piece on Nottingham Irish Studies Group in the Irish Times Generation Emigration blog on 9 April 2014.  The week’s blogs are specially focused on the Irish in Britain, to mark the State Visit of President Michael D. Higgins.

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‘The Irish Short Story: “The Hand Grenade on the Kitchen Floor”‘ in Litro online.Litro logoLitro specialises in the short story, and I was asked to write this as a result of my workshop on the Irish short story in Nottingham Festival of Words.
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FORTHCOMING

I’m working on an article about Moy McCrory’s short stories of Liverpool-Irish life.

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One response to “Published Articles

  1. Read a review of Celtic Connections here: http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture-community/207972-review-celtic-connections-irish-scottish-relations-politics-culture.html:
    “Deirdre O‘Byrne takes us into the heart of Hanna Bell’s December Bride, set in a rural Presbyterian community in Northern Ireland in the early twentieth century. There is an outstanding examination of symbol and language conveying the covert in what is an overt story of a woman finding a place of power on her wits and negotiating skills. O‘Byrne does that elegant thing in an analysis of a novel – pointing to the subtleties in such a way that it makes one yearn to have the very book under examination in one’s hand that very minute. If you ever wondered about the Northern Irish-Scots cultural tradition in the same way that you wondered about the traditions of the people Synge portrayed of the west then this examination of December Bride is for you.” [Review by LamportsEdge]

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